Chocolate nut clusters

Christmas chocolate nut clusters recipe from LandScape magazine

Makes approx 40
300g roughly crushed hazelnuts
250g double cream
400g dark chocolate
icing sugar, to dust

Place the cream in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Grate half of the chocolate into a mixing bowl and pour the cream over it. Mix thoroughly and stir in half of the crushed hazelnuts. Allow to cool, then with hands dusted with icing sugar, scoop a rounded teaspoon of the set mixture out and roll into a ball. Place on a plate and continue until all of the mixture is used. Chill for 1 hr.

Place the remaining crushed hazelnuts on a large plate and have an extra plate handy. Break up the remaining chocolate into a heat-proof bowl. Place the bowl over a pan of gently simmering water, taking care not to let the bowl touch the water. Stir occasionally until melted. Remove from the heat and stir until smooth, then dip each ball into the chocolate, to cover completely, using two teaspoons. Place on the plate of nuts and roll around to cover. Transfer to the extra plate. Repeat with all the balls. Chill for 1 hr, then serve.

Other nut sweet recipes in the Christmas 2016 issue:

  • Hazelnut caramels
  • Fruit and nut fudge squares
  • Peanut brittle
  • Sugared almonds
  • Walnut meringues

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

 

Vegetable wreath

Festive vegetable wreath recipe from LandScape magazine

Serves 8
200g baby carrots
2 red peppers
200g button mushrooms
150g cranberries
150g pinenuts
100g ready-roasted chestnuts
1 tbsp rapeseed oil
sea salt and black pepper
350g crusty white bread
1 garlic clove
150g spinach
1 orange
2 tbsp brandy
1 tsp cinnamon
1 sprig of rosemary,
plus extra for garnish
1kg ready-made
puff pastry
1 egg
cranberry sauce, to serve

Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5. Slice the carrots in half and deseed and halve the peppers, then place on a roasting tin. Add the mushrooms, cranberries, pinenuts and chestnuts. Coat with the oil, season with salt and pepper, and roast for 15 mins.

In the meantime, in a food processor blitz the bread with the garlic clove to make large-sized breadcrumbs and then transfer to a large bowl.

Add the spinach and zest in the orange peel, then sprinkle with the brandy and 100ml of boiling water. Mix thoroughly, then stir the roast vegetables and cinnamon into the breadcrumbs and set aside. Chop the rosemary and add it to the mixture. Turn the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6.

On a lightly floured surface, push the two pastry blocks together to form one block and roll out to approximately 45cm squared. Transfer to a piece of baking paper. Gently mark two concentric circles, the inner 18cm in diameter, the outer 28cm, in the pastry. The filling will sit in the ring between the two circles. Cut curved lines, from the edge of the outer circle to edge of the rectangle. Then cut lines going from the inside of the inner circle through the centre point to the other side, creating segments.

How to score the pastry for vegetable wreath recipe from LandScape magazine Christmas issue

Fill the circular rim with the stuffing mixture then start folding over the outer and inner strips. Wrap around each other to meet in the middle, trimming any excess pastry not needed at the ends and occasionally cutting away the strips to make room.

Beat the egg and brush all the pastry with it to glaze. Transfer, using the baking paper to support the wreath, to a large baking tray. Bake for 20 mins, covering with tin foil if it becomes too golden. Transfer to a serving dish and serve with the extra rosemary and cranberry sauce.

Other festive dishes in our Christmas 2016 issue:

  • Roast turkey with pears and cranberries
  • Cranberry turkey gravy
  • Bacon and thyme roast potatoes
  • Parsnip, swede and horseradish mash
  • Brussels sprouts in a Clementine and honey sauce
  • Cranberry sauce
  • Chocolate yule log

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Chocolate Christmas tree

Serves 10
200g dark chocolate drops
600g plain flour, plus extra for dusting
100g caster sugar, plus extra to sprinkle
1 tsp salt
30g dried yeast
125g milk
3 eggs
100g butter, softened

Place the flour in a large bowl and mix in the sugar and salt. Make a well in the middle and pour in the yeast. Heat the milk in a plastic jug in the microwave for 20 secs, then beat in the eggs. Add the milk and egg liquid to the well, then mix together with a fork, until it comes together to form a dough. Dust a clean work surface with flour and knead the dough for 10 mins. Then knead in 80g of the butter, a bit at a time. Place the dough into a clean bowl covered with cling film and a tea towel. Leave in a warm place to rise for at least 3 hrs.

Knock back the dough by pushing the air out with a fist. Place it on a work surface and divide into three equal-sized balls. Roll each dough ball to a rectangle, measuring 30 x 40cm, then place one on a large sheet of baking paper. Scatter with half the chocolate drops and cover with the second piece of dough, then scatter the remaining chocolate drops over, followed by the last piece of dough. Lightly mark out a central tube for the tree trunk, then cut a triangle from the top middle to the opposite far corners. Make two incisions about 4cm up in the middle of the bottom, to make the bottom tree trunk. From the top to the bottom, on each side, cut strips coming away from the middle trunk, cutting further in higher up the tree. Transfer to a baking tray and twist each strip to form a spiral pattern. Cover with a clean tea towel and put in a warm place to rise for 15 mins. Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5.

Melt the remaining butter and brush it over the bread. Bake for 15-20 mins, until golden and risen. Sprinkle with sugar and serve.

Other breakfast dishes in our Christmas 2016 issue:

  • Rich scrambled eggs and smoked salmon
  • Cranberry and orange sparkler
  • Christmas pancakes
  • Kipper kedgeree
  • Sticky cranberry sausage sandwich
  • Trio of mushrooms on toast

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Smoked salmon and watercress mousse

Serves 6
6 leaves gelatine
100g watercress
4 spring onions
200g cold smoked salmon
2 teaspoons lemon juice
6-8 sprigs of fresh dill
400 ml double cream
Pinch cayenne pepper
2 free-range egg whites
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Put the gelatine leaves into cold water for 10 min.
Finely chop the watercress and spring onions, and place in a bowl. Cut the tops off the dill sprigs and set aside for decoration. In a another bowl, thoroughly blend together the smoked salmon, lemon juice, the remainder of the dill and 4 tbsp. of the double cream, then add the cayenne pepper.
In a separate bowl, whip the cream until it stands in soft peaks and fold half into the salmon mixture and half into the watercress. Season the watercress mixture with salt and pepper. Remove the soaked gelatine leaves from the cold water and place in a small bowl with 2 tbsp. cold water. Place over a pan of gently simmering water and heat until the gelatine dissolves. Stir half the gelatine mixture into the salmon and half into the watercress. Whisk the egg whites and fold into the salmon mixture. Divide the smoked salmon mixture equally between 6 glasses, then top with watercress mousse. Chill in the refrigerator for 2 hours until set. Serve decorated with the dill tops.

Other smoked fish starter recipes in our Christmas 2013 issue:
• Smoked mackerel pate in sourdough croustades
• Smoked haddock soufflé on creamed spinach

Kitchen UTENSILS to help you 

Mincemeat Christmas trees

Makes approximately 12,
depending on size of cutter

150g plain flour
150g self raising flour
2 tbsp. icing sugar
150g butter, cubed
150g mincemeat
1 free-range egg
Caster sugar, to sprinkle

Sieve the flours and icing sugar into a large bowl, add the butter and rub the mixture with your fingers until it forms fine breadcrumbs. Separate the egg and add the yolk to the bowl with enough water to mix to a dough. Allow to rest in the refrigerator for 15 min. Roll out half the pastry and cut out Christmas tree shapes with a large cookie cutter and place, well spaced, on lightly greased baking sheets. Roll out the remaining pastry and cut the same amount of shapes.
Brush the pastry shapes on the baking sheet all over with beaten egg white and place a lolly stick on top of the pastry at the base of the tree. Press down lightly. Put a spoonful of mincemeat into the centre of each and cover with another piece of pastry, gently easing over the filling and pressing down the edges well to seal in the mincemeat. Press the top pastry down gently over the lolly stick so that it is secured in place.
Prick the pastry with a fork. Brush the tops with beaten egg white and sprinkle with caster sugar. Bake in a preheated oven 200C/gas mark 6 for 12–15 min until golden. Transfer to a wire rack and cool.

 


• Mincemeat meringue pie
• Filo stars
• Orange and mincemeat pudding
• Christmas wreath
• Homemade mincemeat
 

Kitchen Utensils to help you  

Ultimate Christmas pudding

A festive tradition

Bursting with flavour, Christmas pudding can be made approximately a month before the big day. Traditionally it is prepared on Stir-up Sunday, which in 2016 falls on 20 November. The phrase comes from the 1549 Book of Common Prayer. The collect for the Sunday before Advent starts: "Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord…" It was suggested this reminded people it was time to make the festive pudding.

Ultimate Christmas pudding recipe from LandScape magazine Nov/Dec 2016 issue.

Serves 12
900g dried fruit, such as cranberries, apricot and figs
150g mixed nuts, such as Brazil nuts and hazelnuts
100g mixed peel
200ml brandy or whisky, plus extra for feeding
200g vegetable suet
100g self-raising flour
1 tbsp freshly grated nutmeg
4 tsp mixed spice
150g breadcrumbs
50g ground almonds
450g dark soft brown sugar
4 eggs
1 orange, halved
butter, to grease

Place the dried fruit, nuts and mixed peel in a large bowl and add the alcohol. Give the mix a thorough stir to combine, and leave to soak for at least 1 hr.

In a separate bowl, mix the suet, flour, nutmeg, mixed spice, breadcrumbs, ground almonds and sugar. Beat the eggs in another bowl and add to the dry ingredients. Mix thoroughly.

Add the fruit and brandy to the mixture, and zest the orange into it. Juice the orange and pour it into the bowl, adding the flesh by hollowing out the orange halves with a teaspoon. Mix together thoroughly. This is the time when, traditionally, the pudding would be passed around the whole family, for each member to have a stir. 

Grease a 1.7 litre pudding basin with the butter. Fill the basin with the mixture and flatten down. Cut a circle of baking paper to fit the top of the pudding and place on the top.

Tightly cover with a circle of tin foil 5cm bigger than the top of the basin. Place a similar size circle of muslin cloth over the tin foil. Secure both layers with a length of string wrapped twice around the circumference of the bowl. Fasten with a tight knot. Place a very large saucepan on the hob and put the basin inside. Fill the pan with boiling water and steam the pudding on a medium heat for 5 hrs.

Allow to cool completely, then remove the muslin and foil. The pudding should be cooked through and firm. Using a skewer, make several holes in the pudding and pour in 1 tbsp of the extra brandy or whisky. Cover with a new circle of baking paper and a double layer of muslin and tie with string. Keep in a cool, dark place until Christmas Day, removing the muslin and feeding with 1 tbsp brandy every week.

To cook on the day, steam on a medium heat for 2 hrs, making sure the pudding is piping hot throughout before serving.

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Lamb scrag cobbler

Lamb scrag cobbler recipe from LandScape slow-cooked meats

Serves 6
1kg lamb scrag
210g chilled butter
1 tbsp rapeseed oil
2 onions, finely chopped
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
2 tbsp cornflour
350ml white wine
200ml vegetable stock
1 head of broccoli, chopped
½ celeriac, cubed
1 tbsp capers
Sprig of mint and thyme, plus extra to garnish
20g fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped
1 Jerusalem artichoke, grated
350g self-raising flour, plus extra to dust
zest of 1 lemon
2 eggs
sea salt and black pepper

Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Place 10g of the butter and the oil in a large heat- and ovenproof casserole dish and heat until sizzling. Add the lamb scrag, browning on each side for 5 mins, then transfer to a plate. This may have to be done in batches, depending on the size of the dish.

Sauté the onion and garlic in the dish for 10 mins, stirring until soft and translucent. Mix in the cornflour and stir in the wine gradually, followed by the stock. Add the lamb scrag and bring to the boil.

Add the pieces of broccoli and celeriac cubes to the dish with the capers and 1 sprig of the thyme. Season with pepper, and cover with a lid. Cook in the oven for 3 hrs.

Place the remaining herbs and grated artichoke in a mixing bowl with the flour. Add the lemon zest and grate in the remaining butter. Season with salt and pepper, then beat 1 egg in a small bowl. Stir the egg and 2 tbsp cold water gradually into the flour mixture until it forms a thick dough. On a surface dusted with flour, roll out the dough to approximately A4 size, then cut out rounds with a 30mm pastry cutter. Place on a cling-filmed plate and cover with more cling film. Chill until needed.

Remove the casserole, and turn the oven up to 190°C/gas mark 5. Push the scrag ends to the middle of the dish, removing any bones if the meat has fallen off. Place the cobbler rounds in the pot, around the sides.

Beat the remaining egg in a small bowl and brush the cobblers with it. Return the dish to the oven, uncovered, and cook for a further 20-25 mins. Serve garnished with herbs.

Other slow cooked meat recipes in our Nov/Dec 2016 issue:

  • Braised lamb shanks
  • Slow-cooked barbecued pork ribs
  • Pig cheek stew
  • Slow-cooked ham hock
  • Pot roast beef brisket with beetroot, swede and whisky

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Quince pancakes

Quince pancakes with quince syrup and sour cream recipe

Makes 14
1 quince, cored and chopped
juice of ½ lemon
50g sugar
110g plain flour
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 eggs
pinch of salt
200ml sour cream, plus extra to serve
50g butter

Place the quince in a saucepan and add the lemon juice. Cover with cold water and add the sugar. Simmer for 40 mins, until soft. Drain, reserving the syrup for later, and place the quince in a bowl. Purée the fruit with a hand blender or in a food processor, then add the flour, soda, eggs, salt and sour cream. Whisk together thoroughly.

In a frying pan, melt the butter and add it to the mixture. When the pan is sizzling hot, add several 2 tbsp measures of the mixture to the pan, a little apart. Fry for 1-2 mins, then turn over and cook for a further minute. This may have to be done in batches, depending on the size of the pan. Serve with the reserved syrup poured over and the extra sour cream.

Other quince recipes in our Nov/Dec 2016 issue:

  • Braised quince and chicken
  • Quince sponge pots
  • Quince paste
  • Quince tart
  • Roast quince

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Pear and blackberry cake

Serves 6-8
2 small firm, ripe pears
1 tsp. lemon juice
1 piece stem ginger,
finely chopped
150g softened butter
150g light muscovado sugar
3 free-range eggs
200g self-raising flour
150g blackberries
icing sugar to dust

 

 

 

Peel, core and dice the pears. Toss in the lemon juice and set aside. Beat the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
Add the eggs one at a time and beat well after each addition, adding 1tbsp of flour with the last egg. Sift the remaining flour into the bowl and fold in. Add the diced pears and sliced ginger and fold in.
Spoon into a greased 20cm-deep round cake tin and level the top. Arrange the blackberries on top of the cake and gently push a little way into the batter. Bake at 180ºC/gas mark 4 for 50–60min or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean.
Allow to cool in the tin for 5min. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely and serve cold, dusted with icing sugar.

 

Other fruits of the harvest recipes in our Sept/Oct 2013 issue:

• Upside down plum tart
• Rich rice pudding with plum compote
• Toffee pears
• Plum and port ice cream
• Blackberry omelette

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Apple crumble and custard tray bake

Serves 15
1.4kg apples
400g soft brown sugar
400g unsalted butter
500g plain flour
200ml custard
1 lemon
icing sugar, to dust

Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Core and thickly slice the apples and place in a saucepan with the juice of the lemon, 200ml cold water and 100g sugar. Simmer for 12 mins, stirring occasionally, until the apples are just soft. Drain and set the pan aside.

Using the fingertips, rub the butter into the remaining sugar and flour in a large bowl. Press two-thirds of it into a greased and lined 23 x 30cm deep tray, then stir the remainder into the apple mixture roughly and pour on top. Mix in the custard in swirls and bake in the preheated oven for 30 mins. Remove and leave to cool in the tray. Once cool, dust the tray bake with icing sugar, cut into 15 squares and serve.

Other tray bake recipes in our Sept/Oct 2016 issue:

Spatchcock duck with squash wedges

Serves 4
1 x 2kg whole duck
1 butternut squash
1 tbsp juniper berries
300g blackberries
3 oranges
150ml red wine
2 tbsp caster sugar
2 tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley
2 tbsp olive oil or duck fat
2 tbsp honey
1 tsp dried thyme
sea salt and black pepper

Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Place the duck on a chopping board, breast-side down. Remove the backbone by cutting around it, then flatten the bird by pushing down on the sides. Turn over and flatten the other side. Place in a roasting tin and season with crushed juniper berries, salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for 1 hr.

In the meantime, combine the blackberries, the juice of 1 orange and red wine in a small pan and add the sugar. Bring to the boil, then add the parsley and season with pepper. Simmer for 10 mins until reduced and sticky. Cover the duck with the blackberry mixture, then cut the remaining oranges into quarters and add to the tin. Roast for a further 30 mins, then rest for 10 mins, covered with tin foil.

While the duck is roasting, chop the butternut squash into wedges and place in a saucepan of boiling water. Simmer for 10 mins, then refresh with cold water. Coat the butternut squash with the oil or duck fat and the honey in a roasting tin. Season with pepper and sprinkle with thyme. Turning the oven down to 200°C/gas mark 6 as they go in, roast for 10 mins until golden and fluffy. Serve with the duck.

Other duck recipes in our Sept/Oct 2016 issue:

Spiced apple chutney

Makes 1.5kg
2.5kg Bramley apples
1 lemon
1.2kg light, soft brown sugar
1 red chilli (optional)
1.2 litres cider vinegar
2 cinnamon sticks
5 star anise
40g fresh root ginger
½ tbsp sea salt
cracked peppercorns

Core and chop the apples into small chunks. Zest and juice the lemon. Place the zest and apple into a large saucepan, stirring in the lemon juice. Add the sugar and 200ml of cold water and stir thoroughly. Heat through, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved and the apples are glossy. Trim and half the chilli lengthways. Add the chilli halves, cider vinegar, cinnamon sticks and star anise to the apple mixture. Bring to the boil.

Peel the ginger, then grate into the saucepan. Add the salt and 1 tbsp of roughly cracked peppercorns. Stir thoroughly and simmer for 4 hrs until thick and sticky.

Transfer to sterilised jars. Place a wax disc on top of the chutney and seal with a sterilised lid. Keep in a cool, dark place for 1 month before opening.

Other chutney recipes in our Sept/Oct 2016 issue:

Rosehip and cardamom cake

Serves 8
200g Rosa rugosa rosehips
15-20 cardamom pods, according to taste
zest and juice of 2 oranges
175g golden caster sugar, plus extra for
sprinkling
175g unsalted butter, at room temperature
3 large eggs
175g self raising flour, sifted
½ tsp baking powder

Top and tail the rosehips, and remove seeds. Preheat the oven to 160c/gas mark 3. Grease and line a 900g loaf tin with baking paper. Using the end of a rolling pin, crack the cardamom pods open and remove the seeds from the shells. Set the seed to one side and reserve the shells.
Simmer the rosehips and cardamon shells lightly in the orange juice for 5 mins in a small pan. Turn off the heat and leave to cool. Remove the rosehips and cut into quarters.
In a mixing bowl, cream together the butter and golden caster sugar with the orange zest and cardamom seeds until fluffy. Gradually add the eggs, including a drift of flour with the last egg to prevent the mixture from curdling. Fold in the rest of the flour, with the baking powder, a little at a time.
Fold half the rosehips evenly into the mixture. Spoon the mixture into the tin. Gently push down any hips above the surface.
Bake for 45 mins until a skewer pushed into the cake comes out clean. Remove from oven and scatter the remaining rosehips over the cake. Remove the cardamom shells from the orange juice. Pour the juice, with a final sprinkle of sugar, over the top of the cake. Return to the oven for another 5 mins.

Other rosehip recipes from our Sept/Oct 2014 issue:

• Rosehip muffins
• Rosehip fruit leathers
• Rosehip marmalade

Roast side of salmon with lavender, orange and honey

Serves 8
1.5kg side of salmon
2 tbsp lavender buds, plus extra sprigs for garnish
1 orange
3 tbsp clear honey
1 tbsp black peppercorns
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
sea salt

Zest the orange into a mortar. Add the lavender buds and peppercorns. Grind with the pestle until roughly blended, then add to a mixing bowl with the honey and oil. Season with sea salt and squeeze in the juice of the orange.

Line a large, deep oven tray with baking paper, then place the salmon, skin-side up, onto it. Coat the skin with half of the lavender mixture. Turn the fish over and cover the top with the remaining mixture. Fold up the baking paper, lift out of the baking tray and place the salmon parcel in the fridge for 1 hr.

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. Return the salmon to the oven tray. Open out the paper parcel but cover the top loosely with foil. Roast for 15 mins, then remove the foil and roast for a further 15 mins, until crispy on top. Transfer to a platter and serve.

Other lavender recipes in our July/August 2016 issue:

Halloumi, tomato and rosemary skewers

Serves 4
4 wooden or metal skewers
500g halloumi
25 baby tomatoes
4 sprigs of rosemary
2 lemons
2 tbsp honey
black pepper

If using wooden skewers, soak them in a tub of cold water for 20 mins, then dry. This helps stop them burning. Cut the halloumi into bite-sized chunks and cut one of the lemons into six, lengthways, then half the pieces vertically to make small wedges. Break the rosemary into 2cm shoots leaving half a sprig for later. Thread the halloumi, lemons, tomatoes and rosemary onto the skewers. Place in a shallow dish or tray.

In a small bowl, zest and juice the remaining lemon. Chop then mix in the rest of the rosemary. Add the honey and ground black pepper. Pour the mixture over the skewers and marinate for at least 1 hr.

Heat the barbecue until the coals are entirely white. Place the barbecue rack on the top position and heat for 10 mins. Place the skewers on the shelf and grill for 4 mins. Using a fish slice to slide the cheese off the shelf, carefully turn over and cook for another 4 mins. Serve.

Other barbecue recipes in our July/August 2016 issue:

Waffle cones

Makes 6
125g caster sugar
2 eggs
65g melted butter
45ml milk
100g plain flour
45ml vegetable oil, plus extra for greasing

Whisk together the sugar and eggs for 2 mins, until light and creamy. Whisk in the melted butter and milk, followed by the flour and oil.

Grease and then heat a non-stick frying pan and pour in around three tablespoons of the mixture into the pan to make a circle. Cook for 3 mins, gently sliding a fish slice underneath to loosen after 2 mins. Flip over and cook for 2 mins. Lay out a sheet of baking paper, then place the waffle on it and immediately shape into a cone shape, using the baking paper and holding in place to fix. Allow to cool wrapped in baking paper for 20 mins, and repeat with the remaining mixture to make six. To serve, fill with ice cream. 

Other ice cream recipes in our July/August 2016 issue:

Quail Egg Salad

Serves 4
12 quails' eggs
2 slices of day-old bread
4 rashers of dry cure back bacon
2 cloves of garlic
2 tbsp. cold pressed rapeseed oil
1 head cos or romaine lettuce

For the dressing
1 tsp. cider or white wine vinegar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
150ml cold pressed rapeseed oil

Bring a pan of water to the boil and add the quail’s eggs. Return quickly to the boil and cook for 3 min. Drain and cool the eggs under cold running water. Gently crack and the peel away the shells. Cut the eggs in half and set aside. Remove the crusts from the bread and discard. Cut the bread into small cubes. Cut the bacon into thin strips and place in a frying pan with the garlic cloves. Cook until crisp, and then remove the bacon and place on a plate lined with a sheet of kitchen paper. Add the oil to the pan then add the bread cubes and toss in the oil. Cook until crisp and golden. Remove from the pan and add to the bacon. Discard the garlic cloves. Wash and shake dry the lettuce and cut or tear into bite-size pieces. Arrange the lettuce, bacon, eggs and bread croutons on a serving dish.
To make the dressing, whisk together the ingredients. Drizzle some of the dressing over the salad and serve the remainder on the side.

Other salad recipes in our July/Aug 2013 issue:

• Tossed leaves with edible flowers
• Sweet & sour cucumber salad
• Fresh bean salad
• Fennel, rocket and goats’ cheese salad
• Beetroot, carrot and apple salad

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Hedgerow terrine

Serves 6
750g prepared hedgerow fruits
150ml red wine
5 tbsp golden caster sugar
8 slices day-old sour dough bread
clotted cream to serve

Place the fruit and red wine in a saucepan with 4 tbsp of golden caster sugar. Cook gently for 15 mins until the fruit is soft. Taste, adding extra sugar if it is required.
Remove the crusts from the bread. Spoon a little juice from the fruit into a non-stick 900g loaf tin. Line the base of the tin with slices of bread. Using a draining spoon, add half the fruit. Continue layering the fruit and bread, finishing with a layer of bread. Pour the juice from the pan into the tin. Allow to cool, then chill in the refrigerator for a minimum of 8 hours and a maximum of 24 hours.
Carefully turn out the terrine onto a dish. Slice and serve with the clotted cream.

Other hedgerow fruit recipes in our July/August 2014 issue:

• Hedgerow shortcake
• Steamed chocolate pudding with hedgerow fruit syrup

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Raspberry Jelly Recipe

Raspberry Jelly
Serves 6-8
 
8 sheets of leaf gelatine
650g raspberries
150g golden caster sugar
450ml water
 

 

 

 

 


Soak the gelatine in cold water until softened. Place 500g raspberries, caster sugar and 150ml water in a pan. Heats gently, until the sugar has dissolved then simmer for a couple of minutes. Push through a sieve into a clean pan. Squeeze the excess water from the soaked gelatine and add to the pan, heat gently stirring until the gelatine has dissolved. Stir in the water and allow to cool. Once cold pour into a 750ml jelly mould and chill until beginning just beginning to set. Drop the remaining raspberries into the jelly and chill until completely set. Turn out to serve.

Other raspberry recipes in our May/June 2012 issue:
* Raspberry summer pudding
* Raspberry and coconut ice lollies
* Raspberry mousse
* No-boil raspberry jam
* Raspberry queen of puddings
* Raspberry tarts

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Broad bean and smoked salmon flan

Serves 6
300g shelled broad beans
100g smoked salmon
tbsp dill
8 eggs
100ml crème fraîche
2 tbsp chopped flat
leaf parsley
1 lemon
1 garlic clove
200g cream cheese
black pepper

Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5. Place the beans in a saucepan and cover with boiling water. Stand for 1 min, then refresh, drain, and peel. Chop the dill, leaving a few larger sprigs for decoration, and slice the salmon into small pieces.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs and crème fraîche together, then mix in the peeled beans, parsley, chopped dill and smoked salmon. Add the zest and juice of the lemon and season with pepper.

Slice the garlic, then place an ovenproof non-stick frying pan on the hob and heat the oil. Sauté the garlic for 1 min, then remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. Pour in the egg mixture, whisking in the pan for 1-2 min, until it starts to firm up, then lightly mix in large spoonfuls of the cream cheese. Top with the garlic and remaining dill. Transfer to the preheated oven for 40 mins. Serve.

Other broad bean recipes in our May/June 2016 issue: