White chocolate cheesecake

 A slice of white chocolate cheesecake, a perfect springtime treat, from a recipe in the May 2018 issue of LandScape

A slice of white chocolate cheesecake, a perfect springtime treat, from a recipe in the May 2018 issue of LandScape

Sweetly creamy white chocolate makes an indulgent filling for this easy cheesecake recipe.

Serves 8
150g white chocolate, chopped
60g white chocolate, grated, to decorate
250g digestive biscuits, finely crushed
125g unsalted butter, melted
3 tsp powdered gelatine (for a vegetarian version, substitute with the same quantity of agar agar)
500g cream cheese, softened
180g caster sugar
150g sour cream
3 tbsp boiling water
white fondant rose, optional

 

Preheat the oven to 175°C/gas mark 4. Separate two of the eggs into two cups. In a large bowl, cream the butter with a pinch of salt, the vanilla extract and 250g of the sugar. Gradually stir in the egg yolks and the remaining eggs. In a separate bowl, mix the flour with the baking powder. Add this to the wet mix in batches, alternating with the gradual addition of the milk. Mix well after each addition. Place one third of the mixture into a 26cm greased springform cake tin and smooth the top.

Using a hand whisk, beat the egg whites, gradually adding the remaining sugar. Loosely spread this on top of the mixture in the cake tin, to approximately 5mm from the edge. Sprinkle with the flaked almonds.

Place in the oven and bake for 20-25 mins. Remove, leaving the oven on, and place on a cooling rack. Carefully ease the cake from the tin and allow to cool. Clean, dry and re-grease the tin, then add the remaining mixture and place in the oven, still at 175°C/gas mark 4. Bake for 40-45 mins. Remove and place on a cooling rack, carefully remove from the tin and allow to cool. Cut this piece of cake into two layers, slicing it horizontally through the centre.

Melt the white chocolate in a basin over a pan of warm water. Place the cream cheese in a bowl and then stir the yoghurt and chocolate into the cream cheese in alternating batches, mixing well in between. Spread the bottom two layers of the cake with the marmalade, followed by the cream mixture and assemble so that the layer with the meringue is sitting on the top. Refrigerate the cake for 2 hrs before serving to allow the cream to firm slightly.

More recipes using white chocolate in the May 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • White chocolate mousse
  • Cupcakes with white chocolate icing
  • White chocolate peppermint bark
  • White chocolate cake
  • White chocolate and orange cookies

 

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Haddock fish fingers with brown sauce

 Easy to make and nutritious, these fish fingers are ideal served with a baked potato and peas or squashed into a sandwich. From the May 2018 issue of LandScape

Easy to make and nutritious, these fish fingers are ideal served with a baked potato and peas or squashed into a sandwich. From the May 2018 issue of LandScape

A familiar evening meal is transformed when made from scratch with fresh ingredients. This simple recipe uses ingredients that are likely to already be in the store cupboard.

Serves 4
For the fish fingers:
460g fillets fresh haddock, skin on
130g oats
40g plain flour
2 eggs
1 tbsp olive oil

For the sauce:
100g raisins
100g dark brown sugar
120ml malt vinegar
200g tomatoes, chopped
150ml water
sea salt

 

For the sauce: Mix together the raisins, sugar, malt vinegar, tomatoes and a pinch of salt in a large saucepan and bring to the boil. Add the water, then simmer on a low heat for 25 mins until thick and glossy. Allow to cool.

For the fish fingers: Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. In a food processor, crush the oats until approximately half their size, then place on a dinner plate. Without removing the skin, slice the haddock lengthways into strips. Place the flour on a plate, beat the eggs in a bowl and season. One at a time, coat each haddock strip in flour, then egg, and finally the crushed oats.

Transfer the haddock to a baking tray lined with baking paper. Drizzle with the oil and bake for 25-30 mins until cooked through and golden. In the meantime, place the brown sauce mix in a food processor and blend until smooth. Transfer to a serving pot. Place the fish fingers on a plate and serve with the sauce.

More recipes using haddock in the May 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Haddock with herbs and lemon
  • Smoked haddock pate
  • Smoked haddock triangles
  • Mini haddock fishcakes
  • Smoked haddock pie

 

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Bacon and egg muffins

 Served with coffee for brunch or as a savoury picnic treat, these muffins make a tasty, filling snack. From the April 2018 issue of LandScape

Served with coffee for brunch or as a savoury picnic treat, these muffins make a tasty, filling snack. From the April 2018 issue of LandScape

Bacon and eggs are given a new twist in this recipe for savoury muffins, perfect for a picnic. The bacon can be replaced with sundried tomatoes or roasted mushrooms for a tasty vegetarian version

Makes 12
6 rashers unsmoked back bacon, snipped into small pieces or the equivalent quantity of sundried tomatoes
8 eggs
100g melted unsalted butter
260g plain flour
1 tbsp baking powder
160ml milk
1 tbsp chopped flat leaf parsley
black pepper
oil, to grease

 

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6, then grease a 6-hole muffin tray. Line the holes with squares of baking paper, folding around the edges as they are placed, to make muffin cases. They may need weighing down momentarily with a pepper grinder or similar object.

Fill a large saucepan halfway up with boiling water and bring to the boil. Turn the heat down until simmering, and lower 6 of the eggs into the water. Simmer for 6 mins until soft boiled. Drain and cool in cold water, then peel carefully.

Whisk the remaining eggs in a bowl, then add half the chopped bacon, the melted butter, plain flour, baking powder, milk and parsley, and season with pepper. Scoop a spoonful of batter into each muffin case, then place one boiled egg on top of each spoonful. Divide the remaining mixture between the cases, covering the eggs.

Sprinkle the tops with the remaining bacon pieces. Bake for 25 mins until golden. Allow to cool slightly on a wire rack before serving.

More recipes using bacon and eggs in the April 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Bacon and egg breakfast layer cake
  • Boiled eggs and bacon twist soldiers
  • Bacon, egg and tomato tart
  • Bacon and egg rolls
  • Bacon, egg and cheese braid
  • Poached eggs on toast with egg and bacon sauce

 

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Edible flower cupcakes

 Sugared viola flowers add a delicate touch to this cupcake recipe. From the April 2018 issue of LandScape

Sugared viola flowers add a delicate touch to this cupcake recipe. From the April 2018 issue of LandScape

Edible violas have a sweet, fragrant taste that works perfectly with confections such as these cupcakes. This recipe requires a little extra time but the effect is delightful.

Makes 12

For the flowers:
12-16 viola flowers
1 small egg white
80g caster sugar

For the cupcakes:
150g margarine, softened
150g self-raising flour, sifted
150g caster sugar
3 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 pinch salt

For the cream:
400ml whipping cream
80g icing sugar, sifted
1 tsp vanilla extract

To candy the flowers: Gently wash the flower petals, then pat dry with kitchen paper. Lightly whisk the egg white in a bowl until frothy. Using a clean pastry brush, paint the egg white onto both sides of the petals. Sprinkle immediately with sugar and leave to set on wire racks before using.

For the cupcakes: Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Line a 12-hole cupcake tin with paper cupcake cases. Beat together all the cake ingredients in a large mixing bowl until smooth and creamy. Divide the batter evenly between the paper cases.
Bake for 20 mins until golden and risen. Remove the cupcakes from the oven and leave on a wire rack to cool.

For the cream: In a mixing bowl, whip the cream with the icing sugar and vanilla extract until semi-stiff peaks form. Transfer to a piping bag fitted with a star-shaped nozzle. Pipe swirls of cream on top of the cupcakes. Garnish each with a candied flower before serving.

More recipes using edible flowers in the April 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Candied viola mini meringues
  • Vanilla cream with sugared violets

 

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Stout and cheddar soup

 A warming bowl of stout and cheddar soup, quickly thrown together from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

A warming bowl of stout and cheddar soup, quickly thrown together from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

Add stout to cheddar for a rich warming soup, in this recipe for quick St Patrick's Day supper.

Serves 4
500ml stout
200g extra mature Cheddar, grated, plus extra for garnish
800g potatoes, roughly chopped
1 onion, roughly chopped
1 garlic clove, roughly chopped
1 carrot, roughly chopped
2 parsnips, roughly chopped
2 thyme sprigs, plus extra for garnish
1 litre water
2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
black pepper

Place the chopped potatoes, onion, garlic, carrot and parsnips in a large saucepan. Pour in the stout, add the leaves from the thyme sprigs and season. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 20 mins until the vegetables are soft. Blend until smooth in a food processor. Return to the heat and simmer while stirring in the water. Bring to the boil and add the Worcestershire sauce. Mix in the grated cheese until melted. Divide between bowls and top with the extra cheese and thyme.

 

More recipes using stout in the March 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Stout and rabbit stew
  • Black velvet cake
  • Braised beef in stout
  • Stout and beef pie
  • Stout and black treacle bread

 

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Rhubarb and white chocolate bake

 A slice of rhubarb and white chocolate bake, from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

A slice of rhubarb and white chocolate bake, from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

A simple recipe for a sweet treat pairing tangy rhubarb with creamy white chocolate...

Makes 9
500g rhubarb, trimmed
400g white chocolate, broken into pieces
1 tbsp caster sugar
150g melted butter, plus extra for greasing
200g light brown soft sugar
2 eggs, plus 1 yolk
250g plain flour
sea salt

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. Roughly chop the rhubarb sticks into 3-4cm pieces, halving lengthways if very thick. Place the rhubarb pieces on an oven tray and sprinkle with the caster sugar. Bake for 15 mins, allow to cool and reserve any juices.

Turn the oven down to 180°C/gas mark 4. In a large bowl, mix together the melted butter and brown sugar until combined. Beat the eggs and egg yolk into the mixture until smooth. Fold in the flour, a pinch of salt and two-thirds of the broken chocolate, then mix in half the cooled rhubarb.

Grease and line a 24 x 24cm oven tray with baking paper. Transfer the mixture into it, spreading it out with the back of a wooden spoon to fit the tin. Scatter with the remaining chocolate and remaining baked rhubarb pieces, then drizzle over the reserved rhubarb syrup. Bake for 20 mins, then cover the tray loosely with tin foil and bake for a further 20-25 mins until slightly browned and loosely firm. Allow to cool, cut into squares and serve.

More rhubarb recipes in the March 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Rhubarb, ginger and vanilla scone ring
  • Rhubarb crumble ice cream
  • Rhubarb puffs
  • Rhubarb and custard
  • Rhubarb tart

 

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CHOCOLATE CHESTNUT PARCELS

 Chocolate chestnut pies, from LandScape magazine Jan/Feb 2017

Chocolate chestnut pies, from LandScape magazine Jan/Feb 2017

Makes 10

For the filling
200g dark chocolate, broken into small pieces
125g peeled chestnuts
120ml milk
1 tbsp cane sugar
1 tbsp honey

For the pastry
1 packet puff pastry
1 egg, beaten
2 tbsp granulated sugar
2 tbsp water
flour, for dusting

For the filling: In a small saucepan, combine the chestnuts, milk and sugar, and bring to a simmer. Cook over a low heat for approximately 20 mins until the chestnuts are soft. Allow to cool slightly. Using a blender, purée the chestnut mixture until smooth and thick. Set aside to cool completely. Transfer to a small bowl, fold the chocolate pieces and honey into the chestnut purée, cover and chill.

 

For the pastry: Between layers of lightly floured baking parchment, roll the puff pastry to 3mm thick. Using a 9cm diameter cutter, make 20 pastry rounds, chilling the pastry and rolling scraps as needed. Transfer the rounds to a baking tray and refrigerate.

Dissolve 2 tbsp sugar in 2 tbsp water in a small saucepan stirring over a medium heat to make a syrup. Remove from the heat, transfer to a small bowl and cover.

To fill the pies: Measure tablespoons of chocolate-chestnut mixture and flatten into discs. Place onto 10 pastry rounds, leaving a 1cm border on all sides, and brush the border with beaten egg. Arrange the remaining pastry rounds on top and press gently to seal. The pastry can be chilled if it becomes too stretchy.

Pour a little beaten egg and syrup into a small bowl and whisk to combine. Paint this sweetened wash over the filled pastries and chill for 30 mins. Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6.

One at a time, bring the pastries from the refrigerator and brush again with the sweetened egg wash. Using a sharp knife, score each pastry surface with leaf-like designs. For a decorative finish, make indents to the pastry edge with the back of the knife. Freeze for at least 15 mins, up to 1 hr.

Bake on two trays, evenly spaced, for 20 mins until golden. Rotate the trays and reduce the temperature to 180°C/gas mark 4 and bake for 20 mins more until deeply golden. Transfer to a wire rack placed on top of parchment to cool and immediately brush with the simple syrup to glaze. Serve warm or at room temperature.

More recipes for pies in the January/February 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Pork rillette pies
  • Chanterelle, onion and buttermilk pies
  • Spiced brown sugar and cranberry rye pies

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CHEESE AND MARMALADE SAVOURY BISCUITS

 Cheese and marmalade savoury biscuits, recipe from LandScape magazine Jan/Feb 2018 issue.

Cheese and marmalade savoury biscuits, recipe from LandScape magazine Jan/Feb 2018 issue.

Makes 12

60g orange marmalade
120g Cheddar cheese, grated
80g softened butter, plus extra for greasing
120g plain flour

In a large mixing bowl, combine the butter and flour thoroughly using the back of a wooden spoon. Add the grated cheese and mix in. Grease a large, flat oven tray and roll 1 rounded tsp of the mixture into a ball. Press down onto the tray to make a biscuit shape, then repeat until all the mixture is used up, spacing them out to allow for spreading. Leave to chill for 30 mins.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5. Top each biscuit with 1 tsp of marmalade, then bake for 15-17 mins until golden and crisp. Allow to cool slightly before placing on a wire rack to cool completely, then serve.

 

 

Other delicious marmalade recipes from the Jan/Feb 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Homemade marmalade
  • Marmalade and ginger cake
  • Apple and marmalade tart 
  • Marmalade bread and butter pudding
  • Orange cream tarts
  • Marmalade trifle

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MARMALADE AND GINGER CAKE

Serves 8

 Marmalade and ginger cake recipe. LandScape magazine, January/February 2018 issue.

Marmalade and ginger cake recipe. LandScape magazine, January/February 2018 issue.

120g orange marmalade, plus 2 tbsp for topping
40g root ginger, peeled and grated
60g unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing
150g caster sugar
1 egg
150ml boiling water plus 40ml boiling water for topping
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
200g self-raising flour, sifted

Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5 and grease and line a 20cm round cake tin. In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter into the sugar with the back of a wooden spoon. Beat in the 120g marmalade and egg, then mix in 150ml boiling water. Stir in the ginger, bicarbonate of soda and flour until combined. 

Pour into the prepared tin and bake for 30 mins until risen, golden on the top and firm to touch. Allow to cool slightly. Then, using a fork, make holes in the top of the cake. Place the 2 tbsp of marmalade into a jug and add 40ml boiling water. Stir thoroughly, then pour over the cake. 

Allow the cake to cool completely before removing from the tin and transferring to a plate. Slice and serve.

Other marmalade recipes in the January/February 2018 issue of LandScape magazine:

  • Savoury marmalade and cheese biscuits
  • Marmalade and apple tart
  • Marmalade bread and butter pudding
  • Orange cream tarts
  • Marmalade trifle

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BACON, MUSHROOM AND CHEESE PANCAKES

 Bacon, mushroom and cheese pancakes.  LandScape magazine, Christmas 2017 issue.

Bacon, mushroom and cheese pancakes. 
LandScape magazine, Christmas 2017 issue.

Serves 4

8 rashers smoked back bacon
150g mushrooms of choice, very thinly sliced
250g light mature Cheddar
250ml milk
125g plain flour
2 eggs
12 on-the-vine tomatoes
2 tbsp olive oil, plus extra for frying
2 tsp honey
1 tbsp chopped fresh curly parsley, plus extra for garnish
20g unsalted butter
1 garlic clove, crushed
sea salt and black pepper

Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4 and place the tomatoes, in clusters of three, on a large oven tray. Drizzle with half the oil and the honey, and season. Roast for 15 mins, then move the tomatoes to one side of the tray. Line the rest of the tray with tin foil and set aside. Turn the oven down to 110°C/gas mark ¼.

Preheat the grill. Lay the bacon rashers on a grill tray and cook for 3-4 mins until crispy. Snip into pieces with scissors and set aside.

In a jug, whisk together the milk, flour and eggs until a smooth batter. Add 50g of the cheese and the parsley. Stir and season with pepper.

Melt the butter in a large non-stick frying pan and add the garlic. Sauté for 1 min, then spoon out the garlic and stir it into the batter along with half of the melted butter. Add the remaining oil to the pan and heat with the butter until sizzling. Pour in approximately 120g of the batter mixture. Tip the pan from side to side so the batter fills it and a disc shape is formed the size of the pan. Cook for 1 min, then place one quarter of the remaining cheese, and a quarter of both the mushrooms and cooked bacon onto one half of the disc. Flip one side over the filling to make a half moon shape. Cook on a low heat for 2-3 mins until the cheese melts. Transfer to the large oven tray with the tomatoes and place in the oven to keep warm.

Repeat with the remaining ingredients to make four pancakes in total, using more oil for frying if needed. Serve each pancake with a cluster of tomatoes and parsley garnish.

Other quick, supper recipes in the Christmas 2017 issue of LandScape magazine:

  • Sausage, kale and potato hash
  • Baked eggs
  • Goat's cheese baked potatoes
  • Breadcrumbed fish and parsnip chips
  • Chicken and potato soup

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CRANBERRY-TOPPED VEGETABLE PIE

 Cranberry-topped vegetable pie, LandScape magazine, Christmas 2017 issue.

Cranberry-topped vegetable pie, LandScape magazine, Christmas 2017 issue.

Serves 6

550g parsnips, quartered lengthways
1 tbsp olive oil
1 garlic clove, crushed
280g mushrooms, chopped
1 tbsp whisky
2 tbsp single cream
340g cooked and peeled chestnuts
200g spinach
1 tbsp honey
150g whole cooked and chilled cranberries
1 tbsp caster sugar
sea salt and black pepper

For the pastry
650g strong white flour, plus extra for dusting
50g chilled unsalted butter
170g solid vegetable fat, plus extra for greasing

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. Grease a 20cm round springform tin and line the bottom with greaseproof paper.

To make the filling: Place the parsnips in a large saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil and simmer for 10 mins until soft, then drain. In the meantime, heat the oil in a frying pan and sauté the garlic for 2 mins. Add the mushrooms and fry for 2 mins, then add the whisky and cook for 2-3 mins more until soft. Season with salt and pepper. Allow to cool slightly, then blend into a coarse purée. Mix in the cream.

Place the chestnuts and 2 tbsp of boiling water in a blender and pulse into a paste. Place the spinach in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Let it stand for 10 mins, then drain and refresh with cold water and drain thoroughly through a sieve.

To make the pastry: Place the flour in a large bowl and add the butter. Rub the butter into the flour with the fingertips. Place the vegetable fat in a large saucepan and add 240ml of cold water and salt. Bring to the boil until the fat has completely melted, then stir it quickly into the flour mixture.

Keep stirring until the dough is soft and elastic, then knead in the bowl for 5 mins. On a clean work surface dusted with flour, roll out the pastry to fit the prepared tin with a little overhanging. Line the tin with the pastry, fitting it to the sides.

To fill the pie: Cover the pastry with a layer of parsnip quarters, then drizzle with the honey. Press the chestnuts into a layer on top of the parsnips with the back of a spoon. Cover the chestnut layer with the spinach, then top with a layer of the mushroom mixture, making sure it is level.

The cranberries are cooked by covering them in boiling water and boiling for 10 mins. They should be left to cool, then chilled. Layer them on top of the pie so they cover it completely, then sprinkle with the sugar. Cut a circle of tin foil the size of the top of the pie to cover the cranberries, but not the pastry shell.

Place the pie on an oven sheet and bake for 1 hr. Allow to cool for 10 mins before removing the pie from the tin and serve hot.

Other festive recipes in the Christmas 2017 issue of LandScape magazine:

  • Bacon-topped turkey with hidden orange stuffing
  • Red Leicester roast potatoes
  • Root vegetable bakes
  • Nutty cabbage
  • Heritage carrots with honey and whisky glaze

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GINGER TOFFEE FUDGE BARS

toffee.jpg

Makes 15 

5g root ginger, grated
200g salted butter, softened
200g light brown sugar
180g plain flour
200g condensed milk

Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4 and grease and line a 24cm x 24cm oven tray. In a large bowl, cream together 100g of the butter and 100g of the light brown sugar. Mix in the flour for 2 mins, until a stiff dough forms. Press the dough down into the tray to cover the bottom, then smooth out with the back of a metal spoon. Score 3 lines across and 5 down with a table knife to make 15 bars. Bake for 15 mins until golden and firm, then allow to cool completely. 

In a saucepan, combine the remaining butter and sugar and melt them gently until the butter is a liquid, without mixing. Then, mix in the condensed milk and turn the heat to medium to high. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 mins until the mixture becomes thick. Continue to stir until the colour darkens and the mixture is very thick. This should take approximately 4 mins. Stir in the grated ginger and pour the mixture over the biscuit base. Allow to cool for 15 mins before scoring the toffee into 15 bars. Leave to set for 1 hr, cut into bars and serve.

Other toffee recipes in the Nov/Dec issue: 

PARSNIP YORKSHIRE PUDDINGS

Yorkshire puds.jpg

Makes 2

200g grated parsnip
2 tbsp sunflower oil
4 eggs
120g plain flour
200ml whole milk
salt and black pepper

Preheat the oven to 220°C/gas mark 7. Place 1 tbsp of oil into each of two 20cm round cake tins. Grease the sides of the tins by carefully moving them from side to side. Place them on an oven tray and put in the oven for 10 mins.

In the meantime, whisk the eggs in a large bowl for 2 mins until frothy, then beat in the grated parsnip. Sift in the plain flour, then whisk until thoroughly combined. Gradually add the milk, combined with 80ml of cold water, while whisking continuously. Season with salt and pepper. 

Open the oven and, using an oven glove, pull the shelf out, holding the hot tray in place. Ladle half the mixture into each tin, then carefully return the shelf into the oven. Bake, without opening the door, for 20 mins. Remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly in the tray. Serve, filled with roast chicken and gravy (see onion gravy recipe on next page) and accompanied by vegetables, such as cabbage and carrots.

Other classic Yorkshire pudding recipes in the Nov/Dec issue of Landscape:

CHESTNUT CAKE

cake.jpg

Serves 8

750g chestnuts
250g butter
150g caster sugar
3 medium eggs
300g plain flour
1 tbsp baking powder
100g double cream
200g icing sugar

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. Place the chestnuts on a baking sheet and roast for 30 mins until the skins are bursting and the nuts are soft. Peel the chestnuts and allow to cool, setting aside a few for decoration. Using a food processor, turn them into a rough paste, then set 100g of the chestnut mixture aside. 

Reduce the oven heat to 190°C/gas mark 5.

Add 150g of the butter to the main chestnut mix and process until combined thoroughly. In a large bowl, cream the chestnut butter and sugar together with the back of a wooden spoon until fluffy and light. Beat in each egg, one at a time, until smooth and combined. Sift the flour, then fold it into the mixture gradually, along with the baking powder. Stir in half
of the cream.

Pour the batter into a greased and lined 1.4kg loaf tin. Bake for 1 hr until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Allow the cake to cool until it can be removed from the tin to cool completely. 

Place the remaining chestnut mixture in the food processor with the rest of the double cream. Combine until a fine purée. In a bowl, cream the icing sugar into the remaining butter until smooth, then beat in the chestnut cream. Remove the cake from its baking paper and top with the icing, decorating with the reserved chestnuts. 

Other chestnut receipts in the Sept/October issue of LandScape includes:

  • Chestnut, thyme and cheese tart
  • Chestnut soup
  • Roast chestnut jam
  • Chestnut trullfes

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PULLED MUTTON SHOULDER WITH COLESLAW

Serves 6

Mutton.jpg

For the pulled mutton

2kg mutton shoulder
2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
2 tsp paprika
2 tsp ginger
2 tbsp tomato puree
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp capers
2 tbsp fresh thyme leaves,
plus extra for garnish
2 tbsp honey
zest and juice of 1 lemon
sea salt and white pepper



 

For the coleslaw

1 onion, peeled and sliced
2 carrots, trimmed and sliced
1 red cabbage, sliced
2 tbsp currants
100g yogurt
2 tbsp fresh flat leaf parsley
crusty bread rolls, to serve

Preheat the oven to 160°C/gas mark 3. In a food processor, blend together the leaves from the herbs, zest and juice of the lemon, honey, pink peppercorns and half of the oil. Season with a pinch of salt and 1 tsp cracked black pepper. 

Place the mutton leg in a roasting tin and coat the meat with the herb mixture, rubbing it in well. Cover loosely with foil. Fill the tin with the white wine and 300ml water. Roast for 4 hrs, basting every hour. Leave to rest, covered in the foil, for 10 mins.

Place the squash pieces in a large saucepan and cover with boiling water. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 10 mins until soft. Drain and mash with the remaining oil and salt and pepper. Transfer the squash to a serving dish and garnish with some extra herbs. Garnish the mutton with herbs, pieces of lemon, sea salt and pink peppercorns. Carve to serve.

Other mutton recipes from the Sept/Oct issue of LandScape magazine includes:

  • Mutton chops in tomato and rosemary sauce
  • Mutton roll
  • Mutton, carrot and cumin casserole
  • Slow-cooked mutton leg with butternut squash

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COTTAGE PIE WITH PARSNIP MASH

 

Pie.jpg

Serves 6

800g beef mince
1kg parsnips, chopped into equal-sized pieces
2 tbsp butter
50g double cream
2 tbsp thyme leaves plus extra for garnish
1 tbsp rapeseed oil
2 garlic cloves, chopped
2 onions, chopped
2 tbsp tomato purée
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
200ml red wine
450ml beef or vegetable stock
200g carrots

Place the chopped parsnips in a large saucepan of cold water. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 20 mins. Drain and season, then mash with half the butter and all the cream. Mix in half the thyme.

In a large pan, heat the oil and add the garlic and onions. Sauté for 5 mins, then add the beef mince. Cook, stirring, for 6-8 mins, until browned thoroughly. Mix in the tomato purée, Worcestershire sauce and red wine and simmer for 2 mins. Stir in the stock and simmer for a further 20 mins. 

Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5. At the end of the simmering time, mix
the grated carrots into the beef mixture. Season with pepper and add the remaining thyme leaves. 

Transfer the meat mixture into a large ovenproof dish and top with the parsnip mash. Melt the remaining butter in a small pot in the microwave for 30 secs, until liquid. Brush the butter over the top of the mash. Cook for 15-20 mins, until golden brown Garnish with thyme and serve.

 

DUCK DELIGHT

Spatchcock duck with squash wedges makes a tasty meal for any occasion. 

Serves 4

Duck.jpg

1 x 2kg whole duck
1 butternut squash
1 tbsp juniper berries
300g blackberries
3 oranges
150ml red wine
2 tbsp caster sugar
2 tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley
2 tbsp olive oil or duck fat
2 tbsp honey
1 tsp dried thyme
sea salt and black pepper

Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Place the duck on a chopping board, breast-side down. Remove the backbone by cutting around it, then flatten the bird by pushing down on the sides. Turn over and flatten the other side. Place in a roasting tin and season with crushed juniper berries, salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for 1 hr.

In the meantime, combine the blackberries, the juice of 1 orange and red wine in a small pan and add the sugar. Bring to the boil, then add the parsley and season with pepper. Simmer for 10 mins until reduced and sticky. Cover the duck with the blackberry mixture, then cut the remaining oranges into quarters and add to the tin. Roast for a further 30 mins, then rest for 10 mins, covered with tin foil.

While the duck is roasting, chop the butternut squash into wedges and place in a saucepan of boiling water. Simmer for 10 mins, then refresh with cold water. Coat the butternut squash with the oil or duck fat and the honey in a roasting tin. Season with pepper and sprinkle with thyme. Turning the oven down to 200°C/gas mark 6 as they go in, roast for 10 mins until golden and fluffy. Serve with the duck.

CORNISH BRIE PIES AND PICKLE

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Makes 4 pies

For the pies

4 wheels Cornish Brie, approximately 200g each

450g plain flour, plus extra for dusting

½ tsp salt

120g unsalted butter, cold and cubed

150g vegetable shortening, cold

80ml boiling water

1 egg, beaten

For the pickle

250ml distilled vinegar

1 tsp caster sugar

¾ tsp salt

1 tsp coriander seeds

6 shallots, halved

165g gherkins in vinegar, drained

For the pickle: Combine the vinegar, sugar, salt and coriander seeds in a heatproof bowl. Microwave on high for 40 secs, then stir well to dissolve the sugar and salt.

Add the shallots and gherkins to the
pickling solution. Cover the bowl, and chill
until needed.

For the pies: Combine the flour and salt in a large mixing bowl, making a well in the centre. Place the butter and shortening in the well, then pour over the boiling water. 

Stir well until the fats melt, then start to incorporate the flour into them with a fork. Once a rough dough forms, turn out onto a lightly floured surface, and divide into four pieces. Knead briefly before wrapping in cling film. Chill for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5. Turn out the pastry onto a floured surface. Roll each piece out into a 30cm wide round. Place the Brie wheels on their centres, and bring the pastry up and around the cheese to envelop.

Seal the pastry on top, and arrange on a large baking tray, spaced apart. Brush with the beaten egg, then bake for 30-40 mins until golden brown all over. Remove to a wire rack to cool. Serve with the pickles.

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DANDELION AND BURDOCK ICE CREAM JELLY

Serves 8

500ml dandelion and burdock drink

550g vanilla ice cream

11 sheets of gelatine

Fill a 900g loaf tin with water, then empty without drying and cover the inside with cling film. Place five sheets of gelatine in a small bowl and cover with cold water. Leave to soak for 5 mins. In the meantime, pour the dandelion and burdock into a saucepan and bring to a simmer for 1 min, until lukewarm. Drain and squeeze the excess water from the gelatine sheets, and stir them into the dandelion and burdock. Pour the mixture into the prepared tin and chill for 3 hrs, until set. Remove the block of jelly from the tin using the cling film, then chop into cubes. Re-wet and reline the tin with cling film, and pile the cubes inside.

Take the ice cream from the freezer and let it melt in a saucepan. Heat for 3 mins, until piping hot, then allow to cool to just above room temperature. While the liquid cools, place the remaining sheets of gelatine in a small bowl of cold water and leave to stand for 5 mins. Drain and squeeze the excess water from the sheets, and stir them into the liquid ice cream. Allow to cool completely, then pour into the tin. Chill for 3 hrs, until completely set. 

Remove the jelly block from the tin, using the cling film. Slice into squares and serve.

Other jelly recipes in July/August issue of LandScape:

Raspberry jelly

Strawberry and cream jellies

Fruity yogurt jelly

Elderflower jellies

Strawberry and mint fizz jellies

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STICKY CHICKEN WINGS

Fresh barbecued meals outdoors heightens the pleasure of warm summer days.

Serves 4

2kg chicken wings 

60ml runny honey

2 lemons 

10g root ginger

1 garlic clove

3 tbsp dark soy sauce,
 plus extra to serve

2 tbsp vegetable oil

50g sesame seeds 

 

Zest one of the lemons and set the zest aside. Peel the root ginger and then grate it, along with the garlic, into a mixing bowl. Add the soy sauce, vegetable oil, honey, the juice of 1 lemon and half of the sesame seeds and mix thoroughly. Place the chicken wings in a large tub and pour over the honey mixture. Cover and marinate in the fridge for 1 hr.

Heat the barbecue until the coals are completely white. Place the barbecue shelf on the bottom position and add the chicken. Cook for 4 mins, then turn over and cook for a further 4 mins, until the meat is white throughout. Serve, sprinkled with the remaining sesame seeds, and garnished with the remaining lemon, cut into chunks.