Recipe: Blackcurrant scones and jam

Blackcurrants make a delicious, seasonal alternative in a cream tea. From a recipe in the July 2018 issue of LandScape

Blackcurrants make a delicious, seasonal alternative in a cream tea. From a recipe in the July 2018 issue of LandScape

A cream tea with freshly baked scones is one of summer's most enjoyable treats. In this recipe, the scones are enhanced with the sweet and earthy blackcurrant, dolloped with cream and blackcurrant jam.

Makes 12
For the jam:
900g blackcurrants
1kg jam-making sugar
200ml water

For the scones:
50g blackcurrants
250g self-raising flour, plus extra for dusting
50g chilled unsalted butter, cubed
2 tbsp caster sugar, plus extra for sprinkling
150ml milk, plus extra for brushing
clotted cream, to serve

For the jam: Place the blackcurrants in a 2.5 litre saucepan and cover with the sugar. Add the water and stir thoroughly. Cook on a low heat for 10 mins, stirring occasionally. By then, the fruit should be producing liquid. Simmer for a further 10 mins on low until a liquid forms properly and the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil. Hold on the boil, stirring occasionally, for 10 mins until the mixture thickly covers the back of a wooden spoon. Sterilise four clean 400g glass jars and lids: cover the lids with boiling water in a bowl for 2 mins, then drain, and pour 20ml of boiling water into each jar, then discard the water. Allow the jam to cool for 5 mins, then pour into the jars while hot. A funnel will make pouring easier.

For the scones: Preheat the oven to 220°C/gas mark 7. Sieve the flour into a large bowl. Add the butter and rub it into the flour by pinching together with fingers and thumbs. Stir in the caster sugar. Add the milk and blackcurrants, then bring together into a dough using the hands. Knead gently within the bowl for 1 min.

On a clean surface dusted with flour, roll out the dough to approximately 2cm thick. Using a 6cm fluted cookie cutter, cut out as many scones as possible, transferring them to a flat oven tray, dusted liberally with flour. Roll out the remaining dough again and repeat the process until there are 12 scones. Brush with milk and sprinkle with sugar, then bake for 15 mins until golden. Allow to cool slightly on the tray, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. To serve, cut in half and top with a spoonful of clotted cream and the blackcurrant jam.

More recipes using blackcurrants in the July 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Blackcurrant torte
  • Blackcurrant ice cream sundae
  • Sausage and blackcurrant rolls
  • Blackcurrant buns
  • Whole gammon with blackcurrant sauce

 

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape.

Recipe: Strawberry and cream tart

A simple, delightful pairing: strawberries and cream, in an easy to make tart. From a recipe in the June 2018 issue of LandScape

A simple, delightful pairing: strawberries and cream, in an easy to make tart. From a recipe in the June 2018 issue of LandScape

With clouds of fluffy strawberry cream topped with sweetly refreshing strawberry slices, this delicious strawberry tart is easy to make and uses only six ingredients – of which one is the fruit.

Serves 8
400g strawberries, hulled
400ml double cream
120g butter, plus extra for greasing
300g digestive biscuits
1 tbsp vanilla paste

Grease a 23cm round, 5cm deep, loose-bottomed tin. In a large saucepan, melt the butter until liquid. In a bowl, crush the biscuits with the end of a rolling pin. Off the heat, add the biscuit crumbs to the butter and stir thoroughly. Press the mixture into the prepared tin using the back of a dessert spoon, to make a tart base, pushing it together until it is solid. This may take several minutes. Chill the biscuit base for 1 hr.

Place half the strawberries in a food processor and blend until pureed. In a large bowl, whip the double cream for 3 mins until firm, then fold the strawberry puree and vanilla paste through the cream. Fill the biscuit base with the cream mixture and flatten with the dessert spoon. Slice the remaining strawberries in half and decorate the top. Leave to chill for 1 hr before serving.

More recipes using strawberries in the June 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Strawberry creams
  • Strawberry shortbread
  • Strawberry-filled meringues
  • Strawberry, thyme and lemon tarts
  • Strawberry drizzle cake

 

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape.

Recipe: White chocolate cheesecake

A slice of white chocolate cheesecake, a perfect springtime treat, from a recipe in the May 2018 issue of LandScape

A slice of white chocolate cheesecake, a perfect springtime treat, from a recipe in the May 2018 issue of LandScape

Sweetly creamy white chocolate makes an indulgent filling for this easy cheesecake recipe.

Serves 8
150g white chocolate, chopped
60g white chocolate, grated, to decorate
250g digestive biscuits, finely crushed
125g unsalted butter, melted
3 tsp powdered gelatine (for a vegetarian version, substitute with the same quantity of agar agar)
500g cream cheese, softened
180g caster sugar
150g sour cream
3 tbsp boiling water
white fondant rose, optional

 

Preheat the oven to 175°C/gas mark 4. Separate two of the eggs into two cups. In a large bowl, cream the butter with a pinch of salt, the vanilla extract and 250g of the sugar. Gradually stir in the egg yolks and the remaining eggs. In a separate bowl, mix the flour with the baking powder. Add this to the wet mix in batches, alternating with the gradual addition of the milk. Mix well after each addition. Place one third of the mixture into a 26cm greased springform cake tin and smooth the top.

Using a hand whisk, beat the egg whites, gradually adding the remaining sugar. Loosely spread this on top of the mixture in the cake tin, to approximately 5mm from the edge. Sprinkle with the flaked almonds.

Place in the oven and bake for 20-25 mins. Remove, leaving the oven on, and place on a cooling rack. Carefully ease the cake from the tin and allow to cool. Clean, dry and re-grease the tin, then add the remaining mixture and place in the oven, still at 175°C/gas mark 4. Bake for 40-45 mins. Remove and place on a cooling rack, carefully remove from the tin and allow to cool. Cut this piece of cake into two layers, slicing it horizontally through the centre.

Melt the white chocolate in a basin over a pan of warm water. Place the cream cheese in a bowl and then stir the yoghurt and chocolate into the cream cheese in alternating batches, mixing well in between. Spread the bottom two layers of the cake with the marmalade, followed by the cream mixture and assemble so that the layer with the meringue is sitting on the top. Refrigerate the cake for 2 hrs before serving to allow the cream to firm slightly.

More recipes using white chocolate in the May 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • White chocolate mousse
  • Cupcakes with white chocolate icing
  • White chocolate peppermint bark
  • White chocolate cake
  • White chocolate and orange cookies

 

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape.

Recipe: Edible flower cupcakes

Sugared viola flowers add a delicate touch to this cupcake recipe. From the April 2018 issue of LandScape

Sugared viola flowers add a delicate touch to this cupcake recipe. From the April 2018 issue of LandScape

Edible violas have a sweet, fragrant taste that works perfectly with confections such as these cupcakes. This recipe requires a little extra time but the effect is delightful.

Makes 12

For the flowers:
12-16 viola flowers
1 small egg white
80g caster sugar

For the cupcakes:
150g margarine, softened
150g self-raising flour, sifted
150g caster sugar
3 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 pinch salt

For the cream:
400ml whipping cream
80g icing sugar, sifted
1 tsp vanilla extract

To candy the flowers: Gently wash the flower petals, then pat dry with kitchen paper. Lightly whisk the egg white in a bowl until frothy. Using a clean pastry brush, paint the egg white onto both sides of the petals. Sprinkle immediately with sugar and leave to set on wire racks before using.

For the cupcakes: Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Line a 12-hole cupcake tin with paper cupcake cases. Beat together all the cake ingredients in a large mixing bowl until smooth and creamy. Divide the batter evenly between the paper cases.
Bake for 20 mins until golden and risen. Remove the cupcakes from the oven and leave on a wire rack to cool.

For the cream: In a mixing bowl, whip the cream with the icing sugar and vanilla extract until semi-stiff peaks form. Transfer to a piping bag fitted with a star-shaped nozzle. Pipe swirls of cream on top of the cupcakes. Garnish each with a candied flower before serving.

More recipes using edible flowers in the April 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Candied viola mini meringues
  • Vanilla cream with sugared violets

 

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape.

Rhubarb and white chocolate bake

A slice of rhubarb and white chocolate bake, from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

A slice of rhubarb and white chocolate bake, from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

A simple recipe for a sweet treat pairing tangy rhubarb with creamy white chocolate...

Makes 9
500g rhubarb, trimmed
400g white chocolate, broken into pieces
1 tbsp caster sugar
150g melted butter, plus extra for greasing
200g light brown soft sugar
2 eggs, plus 1 yolk
250g plain flour
sea salt

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. Roughly chop the rhubarb sticks into 3-4cm pieces, halving lengthways if very thick. Place the rhubarb pieces on an oven tray and sprinkle with the caster sugar. Bake for 15 mins, allow to cool and reserve any juices.

Turn the oven down to 180°C/gas mark 4. In a large bowl, mix together the melted butter and brown sugar until combined. Beat the eggs and egg yolk into the mixture until smooth. Fold in the flour, a pinch of salt and two-thirds of the broken chocolate, then mix in half the cooled rhubarb.

Grease and line a 24 x 24cm oven tray with baking paper. Transfer the mixture into it, spreading it out with the back of a wooden spoon to fit the tin. Scatter with the remaining chocolate and remaining baked rhubarb pieces, then drizzle over the reserved rhubarb syrup. Bake for 20 mins, then cover the tray loosely with tin foil and bake for a further 20-25 mins until slightly browned and loosely firm. Allow to cool, cut into squares and serve.

More rhubarb recipes in the March 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Rhubarb, ginger and vanilla scone ring
  • Rhubarb crumble ice cream
  • Rhubarb puffs
  • Rhubarb and custard
  • Rhubarb tart

 

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape.

CHOCOLATE CHESTNUT PARCELS

Chocolate chestnut pies, from LandScape magazine Jan/Feb 2017

Chocolate chestnut pies, from LandScape magazine Jan/Feb 2017

Makes 10

For the filling
200g dark chocolate, broken into small pieces
125g peeled chestnuts
120ml milk
1 tbsp cane sugar
1 tbsp honey

For the pastry
1 packet puff pastry
1 egg, beaten
2 tbsp granulated sugar
2 tbsp water
flour, for dusting

For the filling: In a small saucepan, combine the chestnuts, milk and sugar, and bring to a simmer. Cook over a low heat for approximately 20 mins until the chestnuts are soft. Allow to cool slightly. Using a blender, purée the chestnut mixture until smooth and thick. Set aside to cool completely. Transfer to a small bowl, fold the chocolate pieces and honey into the chestnut purée, cover and chill.

 

For the pastry: Between layers of lightly floured baking parchment, roll the puff pastry to 3mm thick. Using a 9cm diameter cutter, make 20 pastry rounds, chilling the pastry and rolling scraps as needed. Transfer the rounds to a baking tray and refrigerate.

Dissolve 2 tbsp sugar in 2 tbsp water in a small saucepan stirring over a medium heat to make a syrup. Remove from the heat, transfer to a small bowl and cover.

To fill the pies: Measure tablespoons of chocolate-chestnut mixture and flatten into discs. Place onto 10 pastry rounds, leaving a 1cm border on all sides, and brush the border with beaten egg. Arrange the remaining pastry rounds on top and press gently to seal. The pastry can be chilled if it becomes too stretchy.

Pour a little beaten egg and syrup into a small bowl and whisk to combine. Paint this sweetened wash over the filled pastries and chill for 30 mins. Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6.

One at a time, bring the pastries from the refrigerator and brush again with the sweetened egg wash. Using a sharp knife, score each pastry surface with leaf-like designs. For a decorative finish, make indents to the pastry edge with the back of the knife. Freeze for at least 15 mins, up to 1 hr.

Bake on two trays, evenly spaced, for 20 mins until golden. Rotate the trays and reduce the temperature to 180°C/gas mark 4 and bake for 20 mins more until deeply golden. Transfer to a wire rack placed on top of parchment to cool and immediately brush with the simple syrup to glaze. Serve warm or at room temperature.

More recipes for pies in the January/February 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Pork rillette pies

  • Chanterelle, onion and buttermilk pies

  • Spiced brown sugar and cranberry rye pies

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape.

CHEESE AND MARMALADE SAVOURY BISCUITS

Cheese and marmalade savoury biscuits, recipe from LandScape magazine Jan/Feb 2018 issue.

Cheese and marmalade savoury biscuits, recipe from LandScape magazine Jan/Feb 2018 issue.

Makes 12

60g orange marmalade
120g Cheddar cheese, grated
80g softened butter, plus extra for greasing
120g plain flour

In a large mixing bowl, combine the butter and flour thoroughly using the back of a wooden spoon. Add the grated cheese and mix in. Grease a large, flat oven tray and roll 1 rounded tsp of the mixture into a ball. Press down onto the tray to make a biscuit shape, then repeat until all the mixture is used up, spacing them out to allow for spreading. Leave to chill for 30 mins.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5. Top each biscuit with 1 tsp of marmalade, then bake for 15-17 mins until golden and crisp. Allow to cool slightly before placing on a wire rack to cool completely, then serve.

 

 

Other delicious marmalade recipes from the Jan/Feb 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Homemade marmalade
  • Marmalade and ginger cake
  • Apple and marmalade tart 
  • Marmalade bread and butter pudding
  • Orange cream tarts
  • Marmalade trifle

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape.

Recipe: Chestnut cake

cake.jpg

Serves 8

750g chestnuts
250g butter
150g caster sugar
3 medium eggs
300g plain flour
1 tbsp baking powder
100g double cream
200g icing sugar

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. Place the chestnuts on a baking sheet and roast for 30 mins until the skins are bursting and the nuts are soft. Peel the chestnuts and allow to cool, setting aside a few for decoration. Using a food processor, turn them into a rough paste, then set 100g of the chestnut mixture aside. 

Reduce the oven heat to 190°C/gas mark 5.

Add 150g of the butter to the main chestnut mix and process until combined thoroughly. In a large bowl, cream the chestnut butter and sugar together with the back of a wooden spoon until fluffy and light. Beat in each egg, one at a time, until smooth and combined. Sift the flour, then fold it into the mixture gradually, along with the baking powder. Stir in half
of the cream.

Pour the batter into a greased and lined 1.4kg loaf tin. Bake for 1 hr until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Allow the cake to cool until it can be removed from the tin to cool completely. 

Place the remaining chestnut mixture in the food processor with the rest of the double cream. Combine until a fine purée. In a bowl, cream the icing sugar into the remaining butter until smooth, then beat in the chestnut cream. Remove the cake from its baking paper and top with the icing, decorating with the reserved chestnuts. 

Other chestnut receipts in the Sept/October issue of LandScape includes:

  • Chestnut, thyme and cheese tart
  • Chestnut soup
  • Roast chestnut jam
  • Chestnut trullfes

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape