Recipe: Peach mess

Sweet and creamy peach mess, a simple adaptation on the classic dessert. From a recipe in the August 2018 issue of LandScape.

Sweet and creamy peach mess, a simple adaptation on the classic dessert. From a recipe in the August 2018 issue of LandScape.

This recipe for fresh, sweet peach mess includes instructions on how to make meringue, but for a quicker, easier treat ready made ones can be used instead. Remove skins for a silkier texture, or leave them on for more bite.

Serves 6
4 de-stoned peaches: 2 roughly chopped and 2 sliced
150g caster sugar
165g icing sugar,
plus extra for dusting
6 egg whites
50ml cold water
300ml double cream

Preheat the oven to 100°C/gas mark ½. In a bowl, combine the caster sugar and 150g of the icing sugar. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg whites, using an electric whisk, for 4 mins until thick and fully whipped. Continue to whisk on a low speed and add the mixed sugar a tablespoonful at a time. Whisk on medium for a further 6-8 mins until the mixture is stiff and stands in peaks.

Line a baking tin with greaseproof paper, then spread the meringue approximately 2in (5cm) deep on the paper. Bake for 1 hr, then turn off the oven, leaving the meringue inside for at least 4 hrs.

Place the chopped peaches in a bowl and blend with the cold water until smooth, using a hand blender.

In a separate bowl, whisk the cream for 2-3 mins until just firm, then add the remaining icing sugar. Transfer half of the mix into another bowl. Add half of the peach juice to one of the bowls and stir in thoroughly.

Break the meringue into large pieces. In a large serving bowl, roughly mingle the meringue, cream, peach cream, peach slices and peach juice together.

Dust with icing sugar and serve.

More recipes using peaches in the August 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Peach butterfly cakes
  • Peach upside-down cake
  • Peach tea
  • Peach sorbet
  • Peach cheesecake bars

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Recipe: Chilled strawberry soup

Chilled strawberry soup, a delightfully simple dessert. From a recipe in the July 2018 issue of LandScape

Chilled strawberry soup, a delightfully simple dessert. From a recipe in the July 2018 issue of LandScape

This incredibly simple recipe for a chilled summer soup makes a sweet, refreshing dessert.

Serves 6
500g strawberries, hulled
80g honey
150g plain yogurt
100ml dessert wine
6 fresh basil leaves, to garnish

In a food processor, blend the strawberries until very finely pureed. Add the honey, yogurt and wine, and mix well. Leave to chill for 1 hr.

Stir the mixture, then divide between six cups and garnish each with a basil leaf.
 

More recipes for chilled summer soups in the July 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Raspberry soup
  • Cool cucumber soup
  • Honeydew melon soup
  • Peach soup
  • Chilled spicy tomato soup
  • Beetroot soup
  • Pea, sorrel and mint soup

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Recipe: Blackcurrant scones and jam

Blackcurrants make a delicious, seasonal alternative in a cream tea. From a recipe in the July 2018 issue of LandScape

Blackcurrants make a delicious, seasonal alternative in a cream tea. From a recipe in the July 2018 issue of LandScape

A cream tea with freshly baked scones is one of summer's most enjoyable treats. In this recipe, the scones are enhanced with the sweet and earthy blackcurrant, dolloped with cream and blackcurrant jam.

Makes 12
For the jam:
900g blackcurrants
1kg jam-making sugar
200ml water

For the scones:
50g blackcurrants
250g self-raising flour, plus extra for dusting
50g chilled unsalted butter, cubed
2 tbsp caster sugar, plus extra for sprinkling
150ml milk, plus extra for brushing
clotted cream, to serve

For the jam: Place the blackcurrants in a 2.5 litre saucepan and cover with the sugar. Add the water and stir thoroughly. Cook on a low heat for 10 mins, stirring occasionally. By then, the fruit should be producing liquid. Simmer for a further 10 mins on low until a liquid forms properly and the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil. Hold on the boil, stirring occasionally, for 10 mins until the mixture thickly covers the back of a wooden spoon. Sterilise four clean 400g glass jars and lids: cover the lids with boiling water in a bowl for 2 mins, then drain, and pour 20ml of boiling water into each jar, then discard the water. Allow the jam to cool for 5 mins, then pour into the jars while hot. A funnel will make pouring easier.

For the scones: Preheat the oven to 220°C/gas mark 7. Sieve the flour into a large bowl. Add the butter and rub it into the flour by pinching together with fingers and thumbs. Stir in the caster sugar. Add the milk and blackcurrants, then bring together into a dough using the hands. Knead gently within the bowl for 1 min.

On a clean surface dusted with flour, roll out the dough to approximately 2cm thick. Using a 6cm fluted cookie cutter, cut out as many scones as possible, transferring them to a flat oven tray, dusted liberally with flour. Roll out the remaining dough again and repeat the process until there are 12 scones. Brush with milk and sprinkle with sugar, then bake for 15 mins until golden. Allow to cool slightly on the tray, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. To serve, cut in half and top with a spoonful of clotted cream and the blackcurrant jam.

More recipes using blackcurrants in the July 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Blackcurrant torte
  • Blackcurrant ice cream sundae
  • Sausage and blackcurrant rolls
  • Blackcurrant buns
  • Whole gammon with blackcurrant sauce

 

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DANDELION AND BURDOCK ICE CREAM JELLY

Serves 8

500ml dandelion and burdock drink

550g vanilla ice cream

11 sheets of gelatine

Fill a 900g loaf tin with water, then empty without drying and cover the inside with cling film. Place five sheets of gelatine in a small bowl and cover with cold water. Leave to soak for 5 mins. In the meantime, pour the dandelion and burdock into a saucepan and bring to a simmer for 1 min, until lukewarm. Drain and squeeze the excess water from the gelatine sheets, and stir them into the dandelion and burdock. Pour the mixture into the prepared tin and chill for 3 hrs, until set. Remove the block of jelly from the tin using the cling film, then chop into cubes. Re-wet and reline the tin with cling film, and pile the cubes inside.

Take the ice cream from the freezer and let it melt in a saucepan. Heat for 3 mins, until piping hot, then allow to cool to just above room temperature. While the liquid cools, place the remaining sheets of gelatine in a small bowl of cold water and leave to stand for 5 mins. Drain and squeeze the excess water from the sheets, and stir them into the liquid ice cream. Allow to cool completely, then pour into the tin. Chill for 3 hrs, until completely set. 

Remove the jelly block from the tin, using the cling film. Slice into squares and serve.

Other jelly recipes in July/August issue of LandScape:

Raspberry jelly

Strawberry and cream jellies

Fruity yogurt jelly

Elderflower jellies

Strawberry and mint fizz jellies

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Strawberry and cream jellies

Jelly recipes LandScape magazine Jul/Aug 2-17

Makes approximately 4 x 250ml desserts

1kg strawberries, hulled, plus 4, including stalks, for decoration
350ml whipping cream
9 sheets of gelatine
4 tbsp caster sugar

Blend the strawberries together in a food processor until a smooth puree. Drain the juice into a small saucepan through a sieve, stirring the pulp to extract the liquid. Transfer the strawberry pulp into a separate saucepan and set aside. 

Add enough cold water to the strawberry juice to make the liquid up to 480ml in total. Warm 240ml of this juice mixture with half of the sugar for 3 mins, until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture thickens slightly. Allow to cool a little.

Place seven of the gelatine sheets in a small bowl of cold water and leave to stand for 5 mins. Drain and squeeze excess water from the sheets, then add two to the thickened mixture. Divide this between four serving glasses and freeze for 30 mins.

Bring the pan of strawberry pulp to a simmer on the hob, stirring. Simmer for
1 min, then allow to cool slightly. Add the remaining soaked gelatine sheets to the pulp and stir.

In a large bowl, whisk 250ml of the cream for 4 mins, until soft peaks form. Mix a third of the pulp into the cream and stir thoroughly. Add a layer of the pulp to the glasses, using half of the mixture. Follow with a layer of strawberry cream, using half of the cream mixture. Freeze until needed.

Heat the remaining strawberry juice mixture and remaining sugar for 3 mins, until warm. Place the remaining two sheets of gelatine in cold water to soak for 5 mins. Allow the strawberry juice mixture to cool slightly, then add the softened gelatine, after draining and squeezing out the excess water. Stir, then divide between the glasses. Return them to the freezer for 30 mins.

Add a layer of the remaining strawberry pulp on top of the jelly layers and smooth over with the back of a metal spoon which has been dipped in boiling water. Do the same with a layer of the cream mixture. Whisk the remaining 100ml of cream into soft peaks and layer on top of each jar. Allow to chill for 2 hrs. Add a single strawberry to the top of each before serving.

Other jelly recipes in the July/August issues of LandScape

  • Raspberry jelly
  • Fruity yogurt jelly
  • Elderflower jellies
  • Dandelion and burdock and ice cream jelly
  • Strawberry and mint fizz jellies

Missed an issue?
You can get LandScape back issues or subscribe to LandScape 

 

Pear and blackberry cake

Serves 6-8
2 small firm, ripe pears
1 tsp. lemon juice
1 piece stem ginger,
finely chopped
150g softened butter
150g light muscovado sugar
3 free-range eggs
200g self-raising flour
150g blackberries
icing sugar to dust

 

 

 

Peel, core and dice the pears. Toss in the lemon juice and set aside. Beat the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
Add the eggs one at a time and beat well after each addition, adding 1tbsp of flour with the last egg. Sift the remaining flour into the bowl and fold in. Add the diced pears and sliced ginger and fold in.
Spoon into a greased 20cm-deep round cake tin and level the top. Arrange the blackberries on top of the cake and gently push a little way into the batter. Bake at 180ºC/gas mark 4 for 50–60min or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean.
Allow to cool in the tin for 5min. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely and serve cold, dusted with icing sugar.

 

Other fruits of the harvest recipes in our Sept/Oct 2013 issue:

• Upside down plum tart
• Rich rice pudding with plum compote
• Toffee pears
• Plum and port ice cream
• Blackberry omelette

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Rosehip and cardamom cake

Serves 8
200g Rosa rugosa rosehips
15-20 cardamom pods, according to taste
zest and juice of 2 oranges
175g golden caster sugar, plus extra for
sprinkling
175g unsalted butter, at room temperature
3 large eggs
175g self raising flour, sifted
½ tsp baking powder

Top and tail the rosehips, and remove seeds. Preheat the oven to 160c/gas mark 3. Grease and line a 900g loaf tin with baking paper. Using the end of a rolling pin, crack the cardamom pods open and remove the seeds from the shells. Set the seed to one side and reserve the shells.
Simmer the rosehips and cardamon shells lightly in the orange juice for 5 mins in a small pan. Turn off the heat and leave to cool. Remove the rosehips and cut into quarters.
In a mixing bowl, cream together the butter and golden caster sugar with the orange zest and cardamom seeds until fluffy. Gradually add the eggs, including a drift of flour with the last egg to prevent the mixture from curdling. Fold in the rest of the flour, with the baking powder, a little at a time.
Fold half the rosehips evenly into the mixture. Spoon the mixture into the tin. Gently push down any hips above the surface.
Bake for 45 mins until a skewer pushed into the cake comes out clean. Remove from oven and scatter the remaining rosehips over the cake. Remove the cardamom shells from the orange juice. Pour the juice, with a final sprinkle of sugar, over the top of the cake. Return to the oven for another 5 mins.

Other rosehip recipes from our Sept/Oct 2014 issue:

• Rosehip muffins
• Rosehip fruit leathers
• Rosehip marmalade

Raspberry Jelly Recipe

Raspberry Jelly
Serves 6-8
 
8 sheets of leaf gelatine
650g raspberries
150g golden caster sugar
450ml water
 

 

 

 

 


Soak the gelatine in cold water until softened. Place 500g raspberries, caster sugar and 150ml water in a pan. Heats gently, until the sugar has dissolved then simmer for a couple of minutes. Push through a sieve into a clean pan. Squeeze the excess water from the soaked gelatine and add to the pan, heat gently stirring until the gelatine has dissolved. Stir in the water and allow to cool. Once cold pour into a 750ml jelly mould and chill until beginning just beginning to set. Drop the remaining raspberries into the jelly and chill until completely set. Turn out to serve.

Other raspberry recipes in our May/June 2012 issue:
* Raspberry summer pudding
* Raspberry and coconut ice lollies
* Raspberry mousse
* No-boil raspberry jam
* Raspberry queen of puddings
* Raspberry tarts

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.

Baked beetroot and orange

Serves 10
1.5kg medium sized beetroots
Few sprigs fresh thyme
4 tbsp. rapeseed oil
3 oranges
1tsp balsamic vinegar
50ml vegetable or turkey stock
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

 

 

 

 


Peel the beetroot and cut into thick wedges. Place in a roasting tin with the thyme and oil and toss to coat in the oil. Cover with foil and roast in a pre-heated oven at 180C/gas mark 4 for 30 min until the beetroots are tender. Meanwhile, peel and segment the oranges, saving any juice. Place the roasting tin on the hob over a medium heat and stir in the balsamic vinegar and stock and any juice from the oranges. Bring to the boil and stir until the liquid has reduced to a syrupy consistency. Add the orange segments. Season with salt and pepper and serve immediately.

Other recipes for a traditional festive feast include:

• Three-bird roast
• Nutty roast potatoes

• Lemon glazed carrots and shallots











 

Pickled blackberries

Makes 4 jars
1kg ripe blackberries
6 cloves
1 stick of cinnamon
½ tsp ground nutmeg
3 juniper berries
225g golden caster sugar
125ml cider vinegar

Place the sugar and vinegar in a saucepan. Crush the juniper berries between two teaspoons and add to the pan with the spices. Bring to the boil gently, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 mins. Add the blackberries, cover and simmer for a further 10 mins, stirring occasionally. Pour into sterilised preserving jars, seal and allow to cool. Label and store in the refrigerator for at least one week before using.
Served with cold cuts, duck or lamb.

Other blackberry recipes from our Sept/Oct 2015 issue:

• Blackberry and orange crumble bars
• Blackberry swirl cookies
• Blackberry cake
• Blackberry bread and butter pudding
• Blackberry mousse

Blood orange tart

Serves 6
For the custard
finely grated zest of 1 orange
400ml milk
3 medium egg yolks
75g golden caster sugar
40g cornflour
4 tbsp double cream
For the oranges
100g golden granulated sugar
2 medium blood oranges

For the pastry
75g butter, softened
50g golden caster sugar
2 medium egg yolks
175g plain flour, plus extra for rolling 

To make the pastry, cream the butter and sugar together until light and creamy. Add the egg yolks one at a time, mixing well between each addition. Beat in the plain flour with a wooden spoon, until the mixture starts to come together. Finish by using the hands to bring the mixture together to form a soft dough. Chill for 30 mins. Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured surface and line a 22cm loose bottom deep flan tin. Chill for a further 30 mins. Line the pastry case with parchment and fill with baking beans. Bake the pastry blind in a preheated oven 190°C/gas mark 5 for 12 mins. Remove the baking beans and parchment and bake for a further 5 mins. Leave to cool. Reduce the oven temperature to 180°C/gas mark 4.
To make the custard, heat the orange zest and the milk in a saucepan over a gentle heat until almost boiling. Remove from the heat. Whisk the sugar and egg yolks together until pale and thick, then whisk in the cornflour. Whisk in a third of the hot milk to the egg and sugar mixture. Mix well, then return to the pan. Cook, stirring continuously until the mixture thickens. Remove from the heat and stir in the double cream. Pour into the baked pastry case and allow to cool. 
To poach the oranges, place the granulated sugar in a wide-based saucepan. Add 100ml cold water and heat, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Thinly slice the oranges, discarding the first and last slice of each. Add the remaining slices to the pan. Cook at a gentle simmer for 15 mins, turning the slices halfway through. Remove the slices from the syrup. Drain well before placing on a parchment paper-lined baking tray in a single layer. Bake for 20 mins, then leave to cool. Arrange the orange slices over the top of the cooled custard. Chill until ready to serve.

Other orange recipes in our Mar/Apr 2015 issue:

• Orange gratin
• Orange sorbet
• St Clement's cake
• Caramel oranges
• Orange self-saucing pudding
• Chocolate orange mousse cake

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.