Recipe: White chocolate cheesecake

A slice of white chocolate cheesecake, a perfect springtime treat, from a recipe in the May 2018 issue of LandScape

A slice of white chocolate cheesecake, a perfect springtime treat, from a recipe in the May 2018 issue of LandScape

Sweetly creamy white chocolate makes an indulgent filling for this easy cheesecake recipe.

Serves 8
150g white chocolate, chopped
60g white chocolate, grated, to decorate
250g digestive biscuits, finely crushed
125g unsalted butter, melted
3 tsp powdered gelatine (for a vegetarian version, substitute with the same quantity of agar agar)
500g cream cheese, softened
180g caster sugar
150g sour cream
3 tbsp boiling water
white fondant rose, optional

 

Preheat the oven to 175°C/gas mark 4. Separate two of the eggs into two cups. In a large bowl, cream the butter with a pinch of salt, the vanilla extract and 250g of the sugar. Gradually stir in the egg yolks and the remaining eggs. In a separate bowl, mix the flour with the baking powder. Add this to the wet mix in batches, alternating with the gradual addition of the milk. Mix well after each addition. Place one third of the mixture into a 26cm greased springform cake tin and smooth the top.

Using a hand whisk, beat the egg whites, gradually adding the remaining sugar. Loosely spread this on top of the mixture in the cake tin, to approximately 5mm from the edge. Sprinkle with the flaked almonds.

Place in the oven and bake for 20-25 mins. Remove, leaving the oven on, and place on a cooling rack. Carefully ease the cake from the tin and allow to cool. Clean, dry and re-grease the tin, then add the remaining mixture and place in the oven, still at 175°C/gas mark 4. Bake for 40-45 mins. Remove and place on a cooling rack, carefully remove from the tin and allow to cool. Cut this piece of cake into two layers, slicing it horizontally through the centre.

Melt the white chocolate in a basin over a pan of warm water. Place the cream cheese in a bowl and then stir the yoghurt and chocolate into the cream cheese in alternating batches, mixing well in between. Spread the bottom two layers of the cake with the marmalade, followed by the cream mixture and assemble so that the layer with the meringue is sitting on the top. Refrigerate the cake for 2 hrs before serving to allow the cream to firm slightly.

More recipes using white chocolate in the May 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • White chocolate mousse
  • Cupcakes with white chocolate icing
  • White chocolate peppermint bark
  • White chocolate cake
  • White chocolate and orange cookies

 

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Recipe: Haddock fish fingers with brown sauce

Easy to make and nutritious, these fish fingers are ideal served with a baked potato and peas or squashed into a sandwich. From the May 2018 issue of LandScape

Easy to make and nutritious, these fish fingers are ideal served with a baked potato and peas or squashed into a sandwich. From the May 2018 issue of LandScape

A familiar evening meal is transformed when made from scratch with fresh ingredients. This simple recipe uses ingredients that are likely to already be in the store cupboard.

Serves 4
For the fish fingers:
460g fillets fresh haddock, skin on
130g oats
40g plain flour
2 eggs
1 tbsp olive oil

For the sauce:
100g raisins
100g dark brown sugar
120ml malt vinegar
200g tomatoes, chopped
150ml water
sea salt

 

For the sauce: Mix together the raisins, sugar, malt vinegar, tomatoes and a pinch of salt in a large saucepan and bring to the boil. Add the water, then simmer on a low heat for 25 mins until thick and glossy. Allow to cool.

For the fish fingers: Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. In a food processor, crush the oats until approximately half their size, then place on a dinner plate. Without removing the skin, slice the haddock lengthways into strips. Place the flour on a plate, beat the eggs in a bowl and season. One at a time, coat each haddock strip in flour, then egg, and finally the crushed oats.

Transfer the haddock to a baking tray lined with baking paper. Drizzle with the oil and bake for 25-30 mins until cooked through and golden. In the meantime, place the brown sauce mix in a food processor and blend until smooth. Transfer to a serving pot. Place the fish fingers on a plate and serve with the sauce.

More recipes using haddock in the May 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Haddock with herbs and lemon
  • Smoked haddock pate
  • Smoked haddock triangles
  • Mini haddock fishcakes
  • Smoked haddock pie

 

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Recipe: Edible flower cupcakes

Sugared viola flowers add a delicate touch to this cupcake recipe. From the April 2018 issue of LandScape

Sugared viola flowers add a delicate touch to this cupcake recipe. From the April 2018 issue of LandScape

Edible violas have a sweet, fragrant taste that works perfectly with confections such as these cupcakes. This recipe requires a little extra time but the effect is delightful.

Makes 12

For the flowers:
12-16 viola flowers
1 small egg white
80g caster sugar

For the cupcakes:
150g margarine, softened
150g self-raising flour, sifted
150g caster sugar
3 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 pinch salt

For the cream:
400ml whipping cream
80g icing sugar, sifted
1 tsp vanilla extract

To candy the flowers: Gently wash the flower petals, then pat dry with kitchen paper. Lightly whisk the egg white in a bowl until frothy. Using a clean pastry brush, paint the egg white onto both sides of the petals. Sprinkle immediately with sugar and leave to set on wire racks before using.

For the cupcakes: Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Line a 12-hole cupcake tin with paper cupcake cases. Beat together all the cake ingredients in a large mixing bowl until smooth and creamy. Divide the batter evenly between the paper cases.
Bake for 20 mins until golden and risen. Remove the cupcakes from the oven and leave on a wire rack to cool.

For the cream: In a mixing bowl, whip the cream with the icing sugar and vanilla extract until semi-stiff peaks form. Transfer to a piping bag fitted with a star-shaped nozzle. Pipe swirls of cream on top of the cupcakes. Garnish each with a candied flower before serving.

More recipes using edible flowers in the April 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Candied viola mini meringues
  • Vanilla cream with sugared violets

 

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Stout and cheddar soup

A warming bowl of stout and cheddar soup, quickly thrown together from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

A warming bowl of stout and cheddar soup, quickly thrown together from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

Add stout to cheddar for a rich warming soup, in this recipe for quick St Patrick's Day supper.

Serves 4
500ml stout
200g extra mature Cheddar, grated, plus extra for garnish
800g potatoes, roughly chopped
1 onion, roughly chopped
1 garlic clove, roughly chopped
1 carrot, roughly chopped
2 parsnips, roughly chopped
2 thyme sprigs, plus extra for garnish
1 litre water
2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
black pepper

Place the chopped potatoes, onion, garlic, carrot and parsnips in a large saucepan. Pour in the stout, add the leaves from the thyme sprigs and season. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 20 mins until the vegetables are soft. Blend until smooth in a food processor. Return to the heat and simmer while stirring in the water. Bring to the boil and add the Worcestershire sauce. Mix in the grated cheese until melted. Divide between bowls and top with the extra cheese and thyme.

 

More recipes using stout in the March 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Stout and rabbit stew
  • Black velvet cake
  • Braised beef in stout
  • Stout and beef pie
  • Stout and black treacle bread

 

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Rhubarb and white chocolate bake

A slice of rhubarb and white chocolate bake, from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

A slice of rhubarb and white chocolate bake, from a recipe in the March 2018 issue of LandScape

A simple recipe for a sweet treat pairing tangy rhubarb with creamy white chocolate...

Makes 9
500g rhubarb, trimmed
400g white chocolate, broken into pieces
1 tbsp caster sugar
150g melted butter, plus extra for greasing
200g light brown soft sugar
2 eggs, plus 1 yolk
250g plain flour
sea salt

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6. Roughly chop the rhubarb sticks into 3-4cm pieces, halving lengthways if very thick. Place the rhubarb pieces on an oven tray and sprinkle with the caster sugar. Bake for 15 mins, allow to cool and reserve any juices.

Turn the oven down to 180°C/gas mark 4. In a large bowl, mix together the melted butter and brown sugar until combined. Beat the eggs and egg yolk into the mixture until smooth. Fold in the flour, a pinch of salt and two-thirds of the broken chocolate, then mix in half the cooled rhubarb.

Grease and line a 24 x 24cm oven tray with baking paper. Transfer the mixture into it, spreading it out with the back of a wooden spoon to fit the tin. Scatter with the remaining chocolate and remaining baked rhubarb pieces, then drizzle over the reserved rhubarb syrup. Bake for 20 mins, then cover the tray loosely with tin foil and bake for a further 20-25 mins until slightly browned and loosely firm. Allow to cool, cut into squares and serve.

More rhubarb recipes in the March 2018 issue of LandScape magazine...

  • Rhubarb, ginger and vanilla scone ring
  • Rhubarb crumble ice cream
  • Rhubarb puffs
  • Rhubarb and custard
  • Rhubarb tart

 

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Stuffed cushion of lamb with red wine gravy

Serves 8

1.8kg boned lamb shoulder
300g granary bread
200g peas
1 bunch of fresh mint,
plus extra for garnish
1 egg
1 tbsp flour
1 clove garlic
1 tsp cumin
200g baby shallots
1 lemon
vegetable oil, to grease and rub
sea salt and black pepper

For the gravy
150ml red wine
2 tbsp cornflour
1 tsp honey
250ml vegetable stock

Remove the lamb shoulder from the fridge and bring up to room temperature. Rip
up the bread and place in a food processor, along with the peas, mint, egg, flour, garlic and cumin. Pulse until combined. Peel and trim the shallots and place in a large mixing bowl. Zest and juice the lemon into it. Transfer the pea mixture to the bowl and season.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5. Lay out the lamb shoulder, skin-side down, on a large sheet of tin foil double the size of the lamb. This helps manoeuvre the meat once it is stuffed. Pack the stuffing on top of it and fold the edges of the fat over it to enclose the stuffing. Take a piece of string, approximately 3 metres long, and slide it under the meat. Pull the ends of the string up and over the lamb, crossing them at the top. Hold the string in place while folding the foil over the meat, leaving the ends of the string unwrapped. This keeps the meat and stuffing together as it is turned over. Turn the meat over, unwrap the tin foil from underneath it. Repeat, tying the string at opposite angles, then folding the foil over the meat again. Repeat until the meat has been turned and the string crossed seven times in total. Knot the string and snip away the ends. Transfer to a greased tray, skin-side up, being careful to hold all the stuffing in. Rub with oil and season. Roast for 3 hrs until the skin is crispy and golden. Allow to rest for 20 mins.  

To make the gravy, collect the juices in a saucepan. Heat for 1 min and add the cornflour. Cook, stirring, for a further minute, then stir in the red wine and honey. Bring to the boil and simmer for 1 min, before mixing in the vegetable stock. Season and bring to the boil again, then simmer for 2 mins until thickened.

Cut away the string and discard, then slice the lamb. Serve with the gravy, garnishing the meat with the extra mint.

Other lamb feast recipes in our Spring 2016 issue:

Rack of lamb with basil gravy
Breast of lamb
Mixed steamed cabbage
Zesty layered potatoes
Roast asparagus and garlic
Lemon and raspberry meringue tart

For back issues click here, or to subscribe to LandScape click here.